Sunday, September 30, 2007

Program #430

A nod to political cartoonists today. They have an unparalleled ability to condense complicated situations and issues down to their essence, with the added benefit of (usually) being funny as well.

Here's one that works nicely with the opening set of this program.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
BLONDIE . . . . . Hanging On The Telephone
THE BEATLES . . . . . You Won’t See Me
THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS . . . . . My Rights Versus Yours
THE KINKS . . . . . Sunny Afternoon
JOSH ROUSE . . . . . Love Has Gone
THE POSTCARDS . . . . . Let Go
10CC . . . . . Don’t Hang Up

SPOON . . . . . My Little Japanese Cigarette Case
LILY FROST . . . . . Raise The Veil
HOWE GELB . . . . . Torque (Tango De La Tongue)
JOE HENRY . . . . . Parker’s Mood
CHARLIE PARKER . . . . . Now’s The Time
TIM BUCKLEY . . . . . Strange Feelin’
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Wait For Love
NICK DRAKE . . . . . From The Morning

TOOTS AND THE MAYTALS . . . . . Let The Four Winds Blow
LEE PERRY . . . . . Yakety-Yak
BOOKER T. & THE MG’S . . . . . Heads Or Tails
SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS . . . . . Let Them Knock
BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS . . . . . I Can’t Quit Her
NICK LOWE . . . . . Not Too Long Ago
THE METERS . . . . . Darling Darling Darling
BETTYE LAVETTE . . . . . I Still Want To Be Your Baby
TAJ MAHAL & THE NEW ORLEANS SOCIAL CLUB . . . . . My Girl Josephine

LOVE . . . . . The Red Telephone
THE REAL TUESDAY WELD . . . . . Blood Sugar Love
LEMON JELLY . . . . . Elements
NATASHA ATLAS . . . . . Just Like A Dream
SHEA SEGER . . . . . Walk On Rainbows
XTC . . . . . Love On A Farm Boy’s Wages

So the opener was inspired by Rudy Giuliani's cell-phone escapade during his speech before the NRA. Two questions: How foolish did he look? What was he thinking? It had to be planned in advance, but the only reason it makes sense to do so would be to distract from the total hypocrisy of his position on guns (kind of meets the definition of a "flip-flop" if you ask me). Not to mention the inherent contradiction with his core reasoning on why he's the best choice to be the next president, as the Matt Davies cartoon linked above makes crystal clear. So the call from the wife probably accomplished what it set out to do, but you have to figure it will somehow come back to haunt him later.

The second set pointed out the obvious connection between the new Joe Henry track and the music of Charlie Parker, which seemed to flow nicely into a beautiful old song from Tim Buckley. This portion of the show did a nice job of integrating the new with the old overall. . . .

as did the next chunk, although the links between tracks were more obvious here. It all grew from the new tribute disc for Fats Domino, with an all-star group of musicians performing his tunes. The money earned by this release will go to the Tipitina's Foundation, which is working to save the music of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. As the two tracks heard here make clear, there are some excellent performances on this disc, so if it appeals to you, then pick up a copy—clearly, the money is going to a good cause.

The final set included one each from The Real Tuesday Weld and Lemon Jelly; both came to my attention during the early days of Lucky Dog Radio and quickly became favorites. A couple of old favorites were there as well—Love was under appreciated during their time but they certainly had a signature sound that worked for me, and it had been too long since anything from XTC's Mummer made it into the show, so the track we heard was a nice way to close the proceedings.

Here's a relatively rare live XTC

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Program #429

OK, a little cross/self promotion to start with; those who listen to LDR with any consistency will know that the music of both Roy Orbison and Richard Hawley can be heard pretty regularly on the station. I've been an Orbison fan since I first heard "Pretty Woman" coming over the transistor radio that was constantly glued to my ear back when I was a youngster in the '60s. And Hawley got my attention from the moment I initially heard his first full-length, Late Night Final, when it came out in 2001. Not the least of it was how much at times his tunes reminded me of Roy Orbison.

One of the ways I earn my keep is through freelance writing, and when I found out back in the Spring that Crawdaddy! was going to be resurrected on the Web I sent over a few story ideas. One that fit for them was a piece comparing/contrasting Richard Hawley and Roy Orbison. Today it went live. Here's the link: http://crawdaddy.wolfgangsvault.com/Article.aspx?id=3186

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
NICO . . . . . The Fairest Of The Seasons
SIMON & GARFUNKEL . . . . . Leaves That Are Green
TEENAGE FANCLUB . . . . . Falling Leaves
VAN MORRISON . . . . . Autumn Song
BILLIE HOLIDAY . . . . . Autumn In New York
ROBYN HITCHCOCK . . . . . Autumn Is Your Last Chance
THE KINKS . . . . . Autumn Almanac

JOSH RITTER . . . . . Right Moves
THE ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA . . . . . Livin’ Thing
THE APPLES IN STEREO . . . . . Can You Feel It?
TAKKYU ISHINO . . . . . Stereo Nights
PATRICK WOLF . . . . .Overture
BIG AUDIO DYNAMITE . . . . . Medicine Show

BECK . . . . . Lost Cause
SEAN LENNON . . . . . Friendly Fire
THE WALKER BROTHERS . . . . . The Sun Ain’t Gonna Shine (Anymore)
M. WARD . . . . . Poison Cup
EDDIE COCHRAN . . . . . Three Steps To Heaven
FEIST . . . . . 1234
HEAVY BLINKERS . . . . . Far As You Are
KEITH . . . . . 98.6
BELLE AND SEBASTIAN . . . . . Another Sunny Day

JOE HENRY . . . . . Civilians
RICKIE LEE JONES . . . . . Trouble Man
THE IKE REILLY ASSASSINATION . . . . . It’s Hard To Make Love To An American
RANDY NEWMAN . . . . . Political Science
EELS . . . . . Rock Hard Times
ARCADE FIRE . . . . . Black Mirror
THE MINUS 5 . . . . . Twilight Distillery

Autumn arrived while this show was up, so it offered a chance to begin with a bunch of fall-centric tunes (some more so than others). Still finding it necessary to include something from the Kinks in each program; not sure how long this will last, but fortunately (for this show) Ray Davies wrote a delightful song for the season. And the Van Morrison tune provides Autumnal immersion better than any other for me.

The next set developed when I heard a little bit of ELO in the new Josh Ritter track, which would have been unimaginable prior to the release of The Historical Conquests of Josh Ritter last month. Just goes to show how much he's stretching his sound.

After that came a nice mix of new and old that managed to work its way from the bleakness of Beck to the more optimistic tone of Belle and Sebastian. A couple of sublime pop masterpieces from the Walker Bros. and Keith were highlights for me, and it's always fun to pair songs that in addition to sounding good back to back also contain similar lyrical hooks (here, counting for both Eddie Cochran and Feist).

The final portion grew from the title track to Joe Henry's new disc. It seems there are many civilians these days who feel we're living in rock hard times, as Mark Oliver Everett (or E, as he likes to go by) of Eels so aptly puts it. And as I mentioned during the show, Randy Newman's hilarious "Political Science" is scarier now than when it first came out on Sail Away back in 1972. It was satire back then, even though the world was seriously crazy in those days. But listen to the lyrics today and they certainly seem a perfect fit for our current vice president. Who woulda thunk it?

Here's another great Eddie Cochran number

Saturday, September 22, 2007

Program #428

Some serious medical issues have hit my family over the past week, so I've been pretty preoccupied with all that means. From that standpoint the radio show has been a therapeutic distraction (thinking about and listening to music has always always worked that way for me), but another result is that there's not much else to pass along. So right to the last playlist. . . .

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
BRYAN FERRY . . . . . Jealous Guy
XTC . . . . . Crocodile
IAN HUNTER . . . . . Read ’Em ’n’ Weep
THE MINUS 5 . . . . . I’m Not Bitter
WILCO . . . . . The Thanks I Get
KENNY NEAL . . . . . No More One More Chance
ROD STEWART . . . . . I’d Rather Go Blind
BETTYE LAVETTE . . . . . Jealousy

THE CLASH . . . . . London Calling
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND . . . . . Radio Nowhere
ARCADE FIRE . . . . . Keep The Car Running
JOHN CALE . . . . . Look Horizon
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . Subterraneans
THE BEATLES . . . . . Strawberry Field Forever (Take 7 + Edit Piece)
THE REAL TUESDAY WELD . . . . . Bringing The Body Back Home

THE STONE PONYS . . . . . Different Drum
RILO KILEY . . . . . The Angels Hung Around
THE SHANGRI-LAS . . . . . Leader Of The Pack
NEKO CASE . . . . . Train From Kansas City
ROY ORBISON . . . . . It’s Over
NICK LOWE . . . . . Love’s Got A Lot To Answer For
JOE HENRY . . . . . Love Is Enough
JONI MITCHELL . . . . . Down To You

MOJAVE THREE . . . . . Kill The Lights
THE ZOMBIES . . . . . She’s Not There
THE HIGH DIALS . . . . . Sweetness And Light
THE KINKS . . . . . Tired Of Waiting For you
THE TELEPATHIC BUTTERFLIES . . . . . Love (Is) For Hire
THE SIGHTS . . . . . It Would Be Nice (To Have You Around)
THE TURTLES . . . . . You Baby
THE ORANGE PEELS . . . . . So Far
TEENAGE FANCLUB . . . . . Nowhere Going
THE WE FIVE . . . . . You Were On My Mind
THE MARBLE TEA . . . . . 3 Minute Pop Songs

All of the music in the opener really came from the Bettye LaVette tune, which is from her brand new album. It brought to mind the old Etta James track as redone by Rod Stewart, and then everything kind of fell together backwards from there.

I still remember the first time I heard Bruce Springsteen's "Blinded By The Light" on the radio in 1972; I immediately bought Greetings From Asbury Park, NJ, and I've enjoyed just about everything he's done ever since. So now there's this new track from a new album, Magic, which goes on sale October 2. Perhaps a little slick but good energy is my first reaction, and I'm certainly interested enough to hear more. I expect it will sound pretty good live, and I'll be at the Meadowlands on 10/10 to find out.

It certainly seemed to fit nicely between the Clash and Arcade Fire in a set that ended with The Real Tuesday Weld coming out of one of the versions of Strawberry Fields that's on Anthology 2.

One thing I've discovered after doing this for six-plus years is most shows have a higher percentage of male than female artists. Not sure why that's so, other than to say everything heard on the program is there because I like it. So it's always fun when inspiration—in this case a track from the new Rilo Kiley disc—results in a set filled with predominately female voices. "The Angels Hung Around" somehow reminded me both of very early Linda Ronstadt and the Shangri-las, which led to Neko Case covering another one by those youngsters from Queens, NY (as Ed Sullivan may have once said). One of my favorite Joni Mitchell tunes at the end sounded awful good coming out of new music from Joe Henry. His latest continues the remarkable evolution in his sound; this one has a more organic feel than his last one, Tiny Voices.

This show finished with a track from the Marble Tea, which is the project of a guy named Knight Berman Jr. He records and produces his own music down the Jersey shore, where he lives, and his songs are precisely crafted musical gems that perfectly mirror the mood and subject of their lyrics. All are sung by Berman in a somewhat deadpan vocal style that permits his wit and whimsy to consistently shine. Not to mention that the title of the song we heard perfectly describes all that preceded it in this set.

Here's some vintage Springsteen (9/19/78 at the Capitol Theater in Passaic, NJ. I was there the next night in the 9th row.)

Wednesday, September 19, 2007

Program #427

As I expected, the fact that I and some other (very) small commercial webcasters signed the SoundExchange offer to maintain a semblance of the original deal we signed back in 2006 (which was scrapped when the decision raising royalty rates on every tune heard over Internet radio was made public last Spring) is being trumpeted by SX as proof it is negotiating in good faith. In reality, that is a major exaggeration, because otherwise this whole business would have been settled a while ago.

All small commercial webcasters were given a Sept. 14 deadline to accept the SX offer; if we didn't we would immediately owe payment based on the new exorbitant rates dating back to 01/01/06, and would continue to do so for as long as took for this whole thing to be finally settled. Even then, further royalty amounts would be determined by the details of the settlement. Most (if not all) of us who signed are not represented in these negotiations in any way, and haven't been from the beginning. So it's certainly conceivable that a settlement might be achieved that would benefit those involved, but bypass those of us who aren't.

That's why the pending legislation (IREA) in Congress is the best answer; it will set the royalty rates at a level that's fair to artists and include all webcasters. The IREA has been lying dormant in Congress since it was first introduced last spring; you can help keep it from dying altogether by contacting your representatives and senators. Please go here to learn more.

One valid point made over the past few days is that the agreement I signed only covers SoundExchange members, and that any music I play by artists who have not signed up with SX will be charged for royalties at the new rate. The upshot is that unless non-member artists are willing to sign a waiver forgiving royalties, it's likely you won't hear their music on any station that signed the agreement.

However, for now Lucky Dog Radio will not be changing its programming, and there are no plans to ask artists to waive their royalties. This will be the policy for as long as it's economically feasible. After that, who knows. Perhaps a new law will be in place by then and the issue will disappear. Let's hope so.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
JOHN DOE & KATHLEEN EDWARDS . . . . . The Golden State
PORTER WAGONER & DOLLY PARTON . . . . . Better Move It On Home
THE FLYING BURRITO BROS. . . . . . Christine’s Tune
RHETT MILLER . . . . . Point Shirley
NEIL DIAMOND . . . . . What’s It Gonna Be
M. WARD . . . . . Magic Trick
SIMON & GARFUNKEL . . . . . Bye Bye Love
RICK NELSON . . . . . Lonesome Town
NICK LOWE . . . . . Rome Wasn’t Built In A Day
AL GREEN . . . . . I’m Still In Love With You

THE KINKS . . . . . Polly
ARCTIC MONKEYS . . . . . Fluorescent Adolescent
THE PYSCHEDELIC FURS . . . . . Pretty In Pink
JESSE MALIN . . . . . In The Modern World
THE HIGH STRUNG . . . . . Show A Sign Of Life
THE BUZZCOCKS . . . . . Love You More
BRENDAN BENSON . . . . . I’m Easy
REGULAR . . . . . Parade
RICHARD BUCKNER . . . . . Lucky
R.E.M. . . . . . Carnival Of Sorts (Box Cars)

JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Black Magic
DR. DOG . . . . . Ain’t It Strange
THE RAIN PARADE . . . . . Look At Merri
DEATH IN VEGAS . . . . . Killing Smile
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Moonlight Mile
GROOVE ARMADA . . . . . Remember

JOE HENRY . . . . . Time Is A Lion
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Cold Irons Bound
DEANA CARTER . . . . . State Trooper
MIKE NESS . . . . . Crime Don’t Pay
THE CLASH . . . . . I Fought The Law
JUNIOR MURVIN . . . . . Police And Thieves
JIMMY CLIFF . . . . . The Harder They Come

This program was a little less about new music and more a stream-of-consciousness affair.

Highlights for me included the opening pairing of John Doe and Kathleen Edwards with Porter Wagoner and Dolly Parton; M. Ward's pseudo live track leading into a truly live Simon & Garfunkel covering the Everly Brothers and then on to the Everly's contemporary Rick Nelson; the second set's opening quartet of tunes about the difficulties into which young women can sometimes get themselves; the little bit of latter-day psychedelia that found its way to the Stones soaring highlight from Sticky Fingers and then to Groove Armada's chilly sample of an olde Fairport Convention tune; and the notion of crime and punishment that infused the last group of songs as they worked their way from Joe Henry to Jimmy Cliff.

Here's the Clash doing Junior Murvin

Sunday, September 16, 2007

Program #426

Well, on Friday I bit the bullet and signed on the dotted line with SoundExchange, which represents the major record companies in the continuing battle with Internet webcasters over royalty rates. Lucky Dog Radio is one of a tiny group of stations that had been left twisting in the wind, as we were not a part of any of the different groups of Internet stations that have been negotiating with SX.

Regular listeners have heard my constant pleas for everyone to contact our US Representatives and Senators, and tell them to back the IREA (Internet Radio Equality Act). This legislation has been sitting in limbo since it was first introduced last spring, as Congress wants to see the two sides in this dispute reach an agreement on their own. Unfortunately, although the IREA is by far the best solution, it doesn't stand a chance of passing unless negotiations fall apart.

About a month ago, SoundExchange offered small commercial webcasters a deal to replace the one that was voided last spring when this whole issue blew up. In the big picture there were plenty of reasons not to sign, including the effect any agreement with a group of webcasters may have on the prospects for passage of the IREA. However, by not signing Lucky Dog Radio could potentially owe much more money in royalty payments.

So in the end I had to be more realistic than idealistic. With so much still unknown about where all of this is going to end up, the possibility of agreements creating more reasonable rates for most stations—but not LDR—certainly seemed as likely as any other scenario. I simply couldn't literally afford to let that happen. It's a shame there wasn't better communication between the bigger players and we smaller webcasters, because it may have influenced my decision. In the end I was left to do what I had to in order to protect myself.

What concerns me is this: if the IREA doesn't pass and instead agreements are signed between SoundExchange and the various webcasting parties, we will all be going through this again in 2010 or 2011, because the period covered is only five years (2006-2010). And you can be sure that if the major record companies are thwarted this time around in their attempt to gouge Internet broadcasters for sums of money that are way out of line with what the vast majority can afford to pay, they will certainly try again during the next negotiations. Unless of course their own fortunes somehow improve, but seeing how feeble their response has been so far to the changing nature of the marketplace, that doesn't seem a real possibility. That has been the underlying reason for their strategy with Internet radio (and will soon be with satellite and terrestrial radio as well)—they've lost a lot of cash with declining CD sales, and they've gotta make it up somewhere to maintain those lifestyles.

So it's not too late to do your part to help turn the IREA into law. Take a look here, and follow through to contact your Congressmen and women. It is the best possible way to insure that the radio diversity you can currently find on the Internet continues for a long time to come.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
GEORGE HARRISON . . . . . My Sweet Lord
RILO KILEY . . . . . Silver Lining
LESLEY GORE . . . . . You Don’t Own Me
LOU REED . . . . . She’s My Best Friend
SPOON . . . . . Black Like Me
BOB DYLAN . . . . . The Man In Me
SOLOMON BURKE . . . . . Soul Searchin’

BOB MARLEY & THE WAILERS . . . . . Jamming
ALPHA BLONDY . . . . . Cocody Rock
XTC . . . . .The Loving
PATRICK WOLF . . . . . Bluebells
BRIAN ENO . . . . .Baby’s On Fire
SUPER FURRY ANIMALS . . . . . Baby Ate My Eightball
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . She’s A Rainbow

TIM HARDIN . . . . . It’ll Never Happen Again
JOE HENRY . . . . . You Can’t Fail Me Now
JACKSON BROWNE . . . . . The Late Show
NEKO CASE . . . . . Hold On, Hold On
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND . . . . . Kitty’s Back
THE IKE REILLY ASSASSINATION . . . . . When Irish Eyes Are Burning
JOSH RITTER . . . . . To The Dogs Or Whoever

THE BEATLES . . . . . You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)
THE REAL TUESDAY WELD . . . . . Cloud Cuckooland
THE RAYMOND SCOTT QUINTETTE . . . . . The Tin Trumpet
HENRY HALL & THE BBC ORCHESTRA . . . . . The Teddy Bears’ Picnic
THE CLIMAX BLUES BAND . . . . . Mole On The Dole
RANDY NEWMAN . . . . . Lonely At The Top
THE KINKS . . . . . Top Of The Pops
ART BRUT . . . . . Pump Up The Volume
NICK LOWE . . . . . The Club
ELVIS PRESLEY . . . . . It’s Now Or Never

A couple of comparisons highlight the openng portion of 426. The Rilo Kiley track from Under The Blacklight has a guitar riff that immediately brought to mind My Sweet Lord, and Britt Daniel's vocals often make me think of Bob Dylan from the early '70s.

As I mentioned during the program, last weekend I heard Jamming while strolling through a Brooklyn block party while on my way to pick up my car. The Patrick Wolf track is one of my favorites from The Magic Position, and it seemed to flow nicely into the early Eno tune. And it was fun to hear Super Furry Animals borrowing the Ooh -La-La's from She's A Rainbow on their latest disc.

The last portion of the show was inspired by the Real Tuesday Weld track; for me the first half of that set is a prime example of what freeform radio can offer. And then somehow we worked our way through Ray Davies sardonic look at the hit-making machinery during that time when rock n roll was still a little dangerous to finish with the King making like Mario Lanza.

Here's another fantastic Kinks tune (there are so many)



Wednesday, September 12, 2007

Program #425

Did you see the Rick Rubin profile in the Sunday NY Times Magazine? It asked "Can Rick Rubin Save The Music Business?", and after reading it all I can say is good luck. Not that Rubin doesn't make sense in his assessment of the hole the record companies have dug for themselves, but in his current role as co-head of Columbia Records he seems to have taken on more than any one person can possibly accomplish.

What's so frustrating is that the mess the record companies have made for themselves is having an effect on Lucky Dog Radio, and all of Internet webcasting for that matter. Last spring the royalty rates that 'casters must pay to the record companies for every song you hear were increased by an extraordinary amount. The enforcement of these rates has been postponed while negotiations between the various parties continue, and while possible legislation that might rectify the whole situation languishes in Congress. Depending on what happens, you may see many of your favorite stations disappear, as the only alternative will be bankruptcy (and some will owe huge amounts of cash anyway, because the rates are retroactive to 01/01/06).

As for LDR, the plan is to stick around as long as possible. After all, somebody has to be responsible for keeping Freeform Radio moving forward. Something you can do to help the webcasting cause is visit this site, look over the info there and make your thoughts known where it can matter most.

Here's a link to the Rubin article.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
WILCO . . . . . You Are My Face
THE GRATEFUL DEAD . . . . . Jack Straw
DAVE ALVIN . . . . . Somewhere In Time
MUDDY WATERS . . . . . Good Morning School Girl
RUTHIE FOSTER . . . . . Mama Said
THE STAPLE SINGERS . . . . . Respect Yourself

ELVIS COSTELLO & THE ATTRACTIONS . . . . . Oliver’s Army
THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS . . . . . All The Things That Go To Make Heaven And Earth
DEVO . . . . . Gut Feeling/Slap Your Mammy
ART BRUT . . . . . Late Sunday Evening
BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS . . . . . Spinning Wheel
THE HIGH LLAMAS . . . . . Barney Mix
THE BEACH BOYS . . . . . Cool, Cool Water

ROBYN HITCHCOCK & THE VENUS 3 . . . . . Belltown Ramble
PINK FLOYD . . . . . Bike
AL HIGHTON . . . . . You Think You’re Something Else
THE BEATLES . . . . . I Want To Tell You
THE CLIENTELE . . . . . Here Comes The Phantom
YO LA TENGO . . . . . Black Flowers
THE LEFT BANKE . . . . . Ivy, Ivy
TEENAGE FANCLUB . . . . . Save
FOUR VOLTS . . . . . Sunday Night
THE RAMONES . . . . . I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend
WILLY DEVILLE . . . . . Come A Little Bit Closer
JOHNNY CASH . . . . . Ring Of Fire

JOHN LENNON . . . . . Oh My Love
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Wait For Love
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . Quantum Theory
PAUL SIMON . . . . . Another Galaxy
BRIAN ENO . . . . . Just Another Day
THE PASSENGERS (U2 & ENO) . . . . . Miss Sarajevo

425 opened with one from Sky Blue Sky, on which Wilco has created a gorgeous organic sound that's a real throwback to many great albums from the '70s. The version of Jack Straw from Europe '72 seemed to flow nicely from there, and the Dave Alvin track closed with a guitar riff that brought to mind Muddy Waters' take on Good Morning School Girl.

The second set's Devo track was one I hadn't played in quite some time, and it seemed to fit quite snugly in between new stuff from the New Pornographers and Art Brut. A sublime tune from one of the latest Kennedy Center Honors winners closed out the first half of the show.

Four Volts are an NYC band who makes a glorious noise, but they also have a melodic side, as featured on the track heard in the middle of the next grouping. Earlier in that set was a demo sent me by Al Highton; we made contact through MySpace and after hearing his tunes there I knew I wanted to add his stuff to the mix. Go take a listen for yourself here.

As I mentioned at the end of the program, although I enjoy many different kinds of music, opera isn't one of them. However, when I read the news of Pavarotti's death, Miss Sarajevo immediately came to mind. It's a beautifully melancholic song, and Pavarotti's vocals are a soaring contrast to everything that precedes them.

Here's the only live version (as far as I know) of Miss Sarajevo.

Saturday, September 8, 2007

Program #424

Hey, whaddya know, it's happening just as I planned it—the second show this week is now available. Believe it or not there's more than a little bit of thought that goes into each LDR program, and since I'm doubling the workload I wasn't sure how that would fit in with everything else that competes for my time every day. So far so good, however, and we'll just have to see how long it can stay that way.

Here's the playlist for #424.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
SHARON JONES & THE DAP-KINGS . . . . . 100 Days, 100 Nights
JAMES BROWN . . . . . It’s A Man’s World
GRAHAM PARKER & THE RUMOUR . . . . . No Smoke Without Fire
THE TEMPTATIONS . . . . . I Can’t Get Next To You
THE STYLE COUNCIL . . . . . My Ever Changing Moods
CURTIS MAYFIELD &THE IMPRESSIONS . . . . . It’s All Right
THE BAND WITH VAN MORRISON . . . . . Caravan

WILCO . . . . . Outta Mind (Outta Sight)
THE REAL TUESDAY WELD . . . . . It’s A Wonderful Li(f)e
LILY FROST . . . . . Enchantment
SIMON & GARFUNKEL . . . . . Punky’s Dilemma
JOHN CALE . . . . . Things
THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS . . . . . Myriad Harbour
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Empty Hearts
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND . . . . . Waitin’ On A Sunny Day

RILO KILEY . . . . . Dreamworld
LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM . . . . . Trouble
EELS . . . . . Trouble With Dreams
M. WARD . . . . . Poison Cup
ROY ORBISON . . . . . You Got It
JESSE MALIN . . . . . Black Haired Girl
THE FAGS . . . . . List
PIPER . . . . . Can’t Wait
THE REPLACEMENTS . . . . . Can’t Hardly Wait
JOHN DOE . . . . . Lean Out Yr Window

THE IKE REILLY ASSASSINATION . . . . . It’s Hard To Make Love To An American
JOE STRUMMER & THE MESCALEROS . . . . . Shaktar Donetsk
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Ain’t Talkin’
JOE HENRY . . . . . Our Song
IAN HUNTER . . . . . When The World Was Round

Some highlights for me included the new one from Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings that opened the show—they've been doing some fine work in the fertile funk territory pioneered by James Brown and it sounds as if their new disc, due out in early October, continues in the same vein. The version of Caravan is from The Last Waltz; it's one of my favorite songs about radio and the sense of community it can create under the right circumstances (which have been sorely missing from the commercial dial for quite a while now).

The Real Tuesday Weld is the name used by Stephen Coates; he's able to combine sounds from sources both old and new in ways that I really enjoy. His new disc is called The London Book of the Dead. (It seems the "real" Tuesday Weld didn't take kindly to the usage of her name when Stephen originally came up with the idea; that's why he added in The Real, although that apparently happened after he picked up the domain name.)

People have mentioned that the Rilo Kiley tune that opens the third set sounds an awful lot like Fleetwood Mac, but I found it to work rather nicely with the Lindsey Buckingham track from his first solo disc, Law and Order.

Embarrassing as it is to admit, the first I'd heard of The Ike Reilly Assassination was with the release of We Belong To The Staggering Evening back in May. It became my favorite disc for this summer; I love its energy, and Reilly writes lyrics that combine the personal with the political in a manner that's supremely entertaining. Ian Hunter did the same on his latest disc, Shrunken Heads, which also appeared in May. The disappointment that permeates "When The World Was Round" certainly resonates with my own sense of where things stand in these early days of the 21st century.

There's a pretty damn good article on Mr. Hunter and his new album at the new Net version of Crawdaddy! here. And here's a live performance from earlier this year of "When The World Was Round."

Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Program #423

And so it begins . . . with the 423rd show since Lucky Dog first went live at the very start of 2001. What's different is that this was the last of the weekly shows; from now on Lucky Dog Radio will be a semi-weekly affair, with new programs appearing every Wednesday and Saturday. The first one is up there right now; simply click on the link at the right to give it a listen.

Unfortunately, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act doesn't allow me to preview a show's content while it's currently available. That's why I've decided to offer up the complete playlist from each preceding program, with the hope that it will provide some insight into the particular brand of freeform music radio that I'm practicing here at Lucky Dog Radio. So here's what was heard on the final LDR weekly show.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme)
AZTEC TWO-STEP . . . . . The Persecution & Restoration of Dean Moriarty (On The Road)
THE GRATEFUL DEAD . . . . . Cassidy
DAVID BAERWALD . . . . . Why
BOB DYLAN . . . . . Mr. Tambourine Man
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Next To The Last Romantic
TOM WAITS . . . . . Medley: Jack & Neal/California Here I Come

BIG STAR . . . . . You Get What You Deserve
RILO KILEY . . . . . Smoke Detector
THE SINGLES . . . . . Better Than Before
THE WHO . . . . . I Can’t Explain
ART BRUT . . . . . Direct Hit
BE BOP DELUXE . . . . . Fair Exchange
THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS . . . . . Mutiny, I Promise You
THE MINDERS . . . . . Right As Rain
THE VELVET UNDERGROUND . . . . . There She Goes Again

CAMERA OBSCURA . . . . . Let’s Get Out Of This Country
THE FREE DESIGN . . . . . Kites Are Fun
THE WANNADIES . . . . . Disko
DONOVAN . . . . . Epistle To Dippy
THE CLEANERS FROM VENUS . . . . . Julie Profumo
THE CLIENTELE . . . . . Bookshop Casanova
RICHARD LLOYD . . . . . Alchemy
THE SMASHING PUMPKINS . . . . . 1979
SPOON . . . . . You Got Yr Cherry Bomb

DAVID BOWIE . . . . . A Better Future
CHARLOTTE GAINSBOURG . . . . . The Songs We Sing
THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Sing This All Together
THE POLYPHONIC SPREE . . . . . Mental Cabaret
PULP . . . . . Trees
STARS . . . . . The Night Starts Here
HER SPACE HOLIDAY . . . . . The Great Parade
GEORGE HARRISON . . . . . Between The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea

The inspiration for individual music sets usually comes from new sounds, which was the case with the middle two on this show.

It was the Rilo Kiley tune that got me started on the second group; Jenny Lewis has a lot of fun with the word "smoke" on this track, and the handclaps brought to mind the '60s British Invasion, which led to the Singles, a current band from the Detroit area who clearly were heavily influenced by that sound from over 40 years ago.

Some songs spin around my brain for days after I hear them, and the Spoon track is a perfect example. It's perhaps the catchiest tune in a set full of them.

The final group has a new one from Stars (their album isn't due out until Sept. 25, but this track was made available), but the real impetus for these tunes was my desire to hear that Bowie song.

As for the first set, it came from my reading about the reissuing of Jack Kerouac's On The Road. I have to admit I've never read it, but I'm of the generation that was heavily influenced by the idea of getting up, heading out and looking around to see what you could find, so it certainly had an effect on me.

The Josh Ritter tune is from his brand new disc, and it seemed to fit in nicely with the rest of the stuff that opened the show. Here he is performing another song from his new album.