Saturday, May 31, 2008

Program #492

A little bit of news on the IREA front still offers hope that something may yet come of it, although the finish line is so far off that it's hard to see finalized laws in place before this Congress recesses for good. That doesn't mean the legislation can't be introduced again next year, but with the new developments in the case currently before an Appeals Court it's hard to say what will happen if the IREA is still embroiled in "process." Still, even though some of the specifics may change, I still think the IREA is required no matter what the outcome of that case.

Speaking of the Appeals Court case, the motion of appeal filed by a one-time competitor of SoundExchange stating that the Copyright Board judges were selected in an unconstitutional manner has been granted. The complete news blurb can be found at RAIN.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
THE RUTLES . . . . . Hold My Hand . . . . . The Rutles
THE SINGLES . . . . . Until You Came Along . . . . . Better Than Before
HERMAN’S HERMITS . . . . . A Must To Avoid . . . . . Retrospective
SHE & HIM . . . . . Sweet Darlin’ . . . . . Volume One
MARK PICKEREL AND HIS PRAYING HANDS . . . . . Cherokee Grove . . . . . Cody's Dream
BUDDY HOLLY . . . . . Everyday . . . . . Buddy Holly
MARSHALL CRENSHAW . . . . . TMD . . . . . #447
THE BEATLES . . . . . Honey Don’t . . . . . Beatles for Sale
RICHARD HAWLEY . . . . . Serious . . . . . Lady's Bridge
JOHNNY CASH . . . . . I Walk The Line . . . . . The Essential Johnny Cash
DEWEY COX . . . . . Walk Hard . . . . .Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

NATIONAL LAMPOON . . . . . Those Fabulous Sixties . . . . . Greatest Hits Of The National Lampoon
DAN BERN . . . . . Fly Away . . . . . Fleeting Days
THE IKE REILLY ASSASSINATION . . . . . It’s Hard To Make Love To An American . . . . . We Belong to the Staggering Evening
R.E.M. . . . . . Mr. Richards . . . . . Accelerate
STEVE EARLE . . . . . Amerika v. 6.0 (The Best We Can Do) . . . . . Jerusalem
JARVIS COCKER . . . . . From Aushwitz to Ipswich . . . . . Jarvis
JOSH RITTER . . . . . Girl In The War . . . . . Animal Years
BOB DYLAN . . . . . When The Ship Comes In . . . . . No Direction Home: The Soundtrack (The Bootleg Series Vol. 7)

XTC . . . . . Life Begins At The Hop . . . . . Drums and Wires
VAMPIRE WEEKEND . . . . . A-Punk . . . . . Vampire Weekend
THE ENGLISH BEAT . . . . . Twist And Crawl . . . . . I Just Can't Stop It
THE UPSETTERS . . . . . A Live Injection . . . . . Complete UK Upsetter Singles Collection, Vol. 1
CAIRO . . . . . I Like Bluebeat . . . . . 100% British Ska
THE MARBLE TEA . . . . . Mercury . . . . . Fantastic Day EP
HENRY MANCINI . . . . . A Shot In The Dark . . . . . Greatest Hits
BERTRAND BURGALAT . . . . . TSOM . . . . . The Sssound of Mmmusic
BOB MARLEY & THE WAILERS . . . . . Roots, Rock, Reggae . . . . . Rastaman Vibration

NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS . . . . . Midnight Man . . . . .Dig!!! Lazarus Dig!!!
VANILLA FUDGE . . . . . You Keep Me Hanging On . . . . . Vanilla Fudge
ELVIS COSTELLO & THE IMPOSTERS . . . . . Turpentine . . . . . Momofuku
FIREWATER . . . . . Borneo . . . . . The Golden Hour
BLACK LIPSTICK . . . . . Yesterday’s Horoscope Was Right . . . . . Converted Thieves
TELEVISION . . . . . Prove It . . . . . Marquee Moon

This opener developed after I saw Walk Tall: The Dewey Cox Story on DVD, which was a lot of fun, very silly but also smart about the music history it portrays. So it was music from another fake biopic, about the The Legend That Lasted A Lunchtime (aka the Prefab Four), that kicked off the proceedings, followed by one from The Singles, who did a nice job of approximating the mid-'60s British Invasion sound on their debut disc. Herman's Hermits provided a taste of the real thing, and then it was She & Him leaning toward the pop side of their range even as Zooey Deschannel allows the country influences on her vocals to surface. That fed nicely into one of the more pop-oriented tunes on the latest from Mark Pickerel and His Praying Hands that then brought to mind an old one from Marshall Crenshaw. Of course, Marhall played Buddy Holly in La Bamba, and then it was the real Fab Four covering another rock 'n' roll pioneer flowing rather easily into a bit of rockabilly from Richard Hawley's last one. That set up Johnny Cash followed by the title track to his movie from Mr. Dewey Cox himself, played by John C. Reilly in the film (and that's his voice you hear coming out his mouth in the film).

Christopher Guest as Bob Dylan as a pitchman for '60s song compilations from an old National Lampoon LP came about due to a short scene in Walk Hard where Dewey Cox takes on the Dylan persona circa 1964-65, singing an incomprehensible song full of hilarious images written by Dan Bern. The Ike Reilly Assassination tune marvelously combines the political and the personal, as does the one from R.E.M's latest, although it's not clear just who Mr. Richards is (or if indeed the song is directed at an actual person). Steve Earle provided a snapshot of early 21st-century America, and then Jarvis Cocker provided some insight into the fine line that separates public policy from atrocity. Josh Ritter perfectly captured the anguish and dislocation felt by too many Americans over the past five-plus years, and then it was Mr. Dylan, clearly an inspiration for everyone that preceded him in this section, with a tune that warns of a retribution that will come.

The next set brought a change of mood with an old one from XTC; the rhythmic guitar at the end of that tune worked nicely with one of my favorites from the Vampire Weekend debut disc. Some late-'70s ska revival by the English Beat led to a rocksteady track from a decade or so prior by the Upsetters followed by a more obscure late-'70s track by Cairo that I have on a 7-inch disc. The vocals on that one brought to mind Knight Berman Jr.'s Marble Tea, which uses a guitar line that's quite similar to a Henry Mancini title tune from an old Peter Sellers movie in which he played Inspector Clouseau—the only film in the series that made no mention of the Pink Panther. Some recent French pop by Bertrand Burgalat with an almost dub-style bass fed into Bob Marley & the Wailers to close it out.

The finale began with another one from the latest by Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds, this time with a '60s-sounding organ that brought to mind none other than Vanilla Fudge, whose 1967 remake of the Supremes No. 1 hit from just a few months prior was startling at the time. From there it was on to a new one from Elvis Costello & the Imposters with thick carpet of drums that segued neatly into a danceable one from the latest by Firewater. Although it's not as demonstrative, the Black Lipstick track has a similar rhythmic feel, and then it was Television to bring down the curtain.

Here's another one from Dewey Cox

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Program #491

A couple of things caught my eye in this edition of RAIN that seem worth noting.

The first is the challenge concerning the constitutionality of the manner in which the three judges on the Copyright Royalty Board were appointed. If the company making this challenge is allowed to proceed in the Appeals Court currently handling the case, a major wrench could be thrown into the works.

The question I'm most curious about is: Would that be beneficial to web broadcasters in the long run? I'm not qualified to make a judgment, but I will be following this development as it moves forward (if it does).

Also, it was exciting to see that the FCC seems prepared to become more proactive about increasing wireless availability. Here's hoping they follow through and make it a requirement for whoever wins the next airwaves auction.

NELSON RIDDLE ORCHESTRA . . . . . Route 66 Theme (opening theme) . . . . . Route 66 and Other Great TV Themes/More Hit TV Themes
CLEANERS FROM VENUS . . . . . Summer In A Smal Town . . . . . Golden Cleaners
KING OF SPAIN . . . . . Decades . . . . . Entropy
PAUL MCCARTNEY . . . . . Ram On . . . . . Ram
FEIST . . . . . 1234 . . . . . The Reminder
KEVIN TIHISTA’S RED TERROR . . . . . Back To Budapest . . . . . Judo
THE KINKS . . . . . This Is Where I Belong . . . . . The Kink Kronikles
SUPERGRASS . . . . . When I Needed You . . . . . Diamond Hoo Ha
NICOLE ATKINS . . . . . Party’s Over . . . . . Neptune City

THE MINUS 5 . . . . . Your Day Will Come . . . . . Because We Hate You/Let the War Against Music Begin
DESTROYER . . . . . The State . . . . . Trouble in Dreams
DAVID BOWIE . . . . . The Man Who Sold The World . . . . . The Man Who Sold the World
DEVOTCHKA . . . . . New World . . . . . A Mad and Faithful Telling
WIN WIN WINTER . . . . . New Accents . . . . . A Brief History Of...
ROD STEWART . . . . . Italian Girls . . . . . Never a Dull Moment

THE ROLLING STONES . . . . . Live With Me . . . . . Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out!
NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS . . . . . Today’s Lesson . . . . . Dig!!! Lazarus Dig!!!
SPOON . . . . . Rhthm And Soul . . . . . Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga
WILCO . . . . . Heavy Metal Drummer . . . . . yankee hotel foxtrot
THE HELIO SEQUENCE . . . . . Back To This . . . . . Keep Your Eyes Ahead
UNIT 4+2 . . . . . Concrete And Clay . . . . . The British Invasion: History of British Rock, Vol. 6
JACK PENATE . . . . . Torn On The Platform . . . . . Matinee
THE SPECIALS . . . . . You’re Wondering Now . . . . . Specials
LEE PERRY & THE UPSETTERS . . . . . People Funny Boy . . . . . Some of the Best

TOM WAITS . . . . . I Can’t Wait To Get Off Work . . . . . Small Change
SHE & HIM . . . . . I Thought I Saw Your Face Today . . . . . Volume One
KIRSTY MACCOLL . . . . . They Don’t Know . . . . . The Stiff Records Box Set
THE RASCALS . . . . . How Can I Be Sure . . . . . Anthology (1965-1972)
PERNICE BROTHERS . . . . . Zero Refills . . . . . Live a Little
THE SEARCHERS . . . . . When You Walk In The Room . . . . . The Very Best of the Searchers
THE CURE . . . . . Boys Don’t Cry . . . . . Teenage Kicks
THE PERISHERS . . . . . Carefree . . . . . Victorious
BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD . . . . . Bluebird . . . . . Buffalo Springfield Again
RYAN ADAMS . . . . . Pearls On A String . . . . . Easy Tiger
JORMA KAUKONEN . . . . . I’ll Be All Right . . . . . Quah

As this program coincided with Memorial Day weekend and the unofficial beginning of Summer, the Cleaners From Venus had an appropriate tune to kick it off. The hazy feeling continued with a new one from King Of Spain that contains what is probably a guitar sounding like a ukulele (unless it actually is a ukulele); whatever the case, it fed nicely into an often-overlooked Paul McCartney tune that does feature a uke. Feist maintained the rhythmic feel, and then it was Kevin Tihista's Red Terror with a track that builds to a rather 1967 Beatles-sounding finish. The Kinks followed with the B side from a single released that same year that led to one from the upcoming Supergrass disc about a guy who probably wishes he had the certainty expressed by Ray Davies about his place in the world. Then Nicole Atkins seemed to sum it up well with the track that closes out her last release.

The Minus 5 began the next section with a funny tune that offers some cautionary advice in its first half before Robyn Hitchcock narrates the strange tale of Lady Lydia, whose day indeed seems to have come. From there it was Destroyer with another of Dan Bejar's flights of fancy segueing nicely into the title track from an early David Bowie album. The sense of unease continued with one from the latest DeVotchKa disc followed by one from the debut EP by Win Win Winter before abating with an old one by Rod Stewart from the days before his creativity went south.

The semi-lurid adventures of Little Janey and Mr. Sandman in the Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds tune brought to mind an old Rolling Stones track, and the rhythm created by Mr. Cave and his partners in crime fed smoothly into one from Spoon's last disc. The beats kept evolving through an older one by Wilco and a new tune from the Helio Sequence that most reminds me of a Bugs Bunny cartoon in which the wascally wabbit is done up as Carmen Miranda for a short bit. Not having access to that, it was on to British Invasion one-hit wonders Unit 4+2 followed by Jack Penate and his energetic almost-ska from this year's debut (in the U.S.). Then some Specials' brand of rocksteady was succeeded by the real thing from Lee Perry & the Upsetters.

Tom Waits in a wistfully romantic mood led to a new one from She & Him that occupies the same territory. A defiant Kirsty MacColl was followed by an old pop gem from the Rascals. A portion of the piano line on that one is replicated (almost) in the Pernice Brothers track that followed, and then the Searchers' jangly guitars emphasized the pain of love lost. Some very early Cure on the same subject was reinforced by Sweden's Perishers from their 2007 disc. The Perishers use of banjo brought to mind an old from the Buffalo Springfield that flowed nicely into Ryan Adams in more of a country mood before the whole thing ended on an optimistic note with a beautiful acoustic tune from Jorma Kaukonen.

Here's another one from the Specials